Guide créé par Kevin

Kevin
Guide créé par Kevin

Informations sur la ville

With its wide view of the sea, Brest is a city with many faces. In what other metropolis do an urban cable car, a military port, a medieval castle and two marinas meet? Brest offers a multitude of very rich discoveries. Follow the leader ! In Brest, you immediately have the impression of being in the heart of the harbor. Apart from Sydney, this type of maritime configuration is unique in the world! In addition to the military port, the city has two marinas, including one in the city center, to accommodate pleasure boats. The jingling of the masts, the songs of the seagulls, the salty air… Here the nautical atmosphere is in full swing! The main focus is on water sports and activities, whether it be long races or strolls in the harbor aboard an old rig. But it would be reductive to limit Brest to its maritime atmosphere. She is much more than that! Cultural, historical, contemporary… the Brest metropolis is full of life!
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Brest
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With its wide view of the sea, Brest is a city with many faces. In what other metropolis do an urban cable car, a military port, a medieval castle and two marinas meet? Brest offers a multitude of very rich discoveries. Follow the leader ! In Brest, you immediately have the impression of being in the heart of the harbor. Apart from Sydney, this type of maritime configuration is unique in the world! In addition to the military port, the city has two marinas, including one in the city center, to accommodate pleasure boats. The jingling of the masts, the songs of the seagulls, the salty air… Here the nautical atmosphere is in full swing! The main focus is on water sports and activities, whether it be long races or strolls in the harbor aboard an old rig. But it would be reductive to limit Brest to its maritime atmosphere. She is much more than that! Cultural, historical, contemporary… the Brest metropolis is full of life!
In the bay of Brest, between the Léon and Cornouaille areas, and between the river and the sea, Landerneau has a remarkable architectural heritage. The jewel in its architectural crown is the famous Rohan bridge, the only bridge in Europe that still has people living on it. As you explore around it, you’ll pass a succession of beautiful residences dating from the 16th to 19th centuries. The superb Rohan bridge stands at the furthest point reached by the tide, with its six stone arches standing in salt water. Built in the 16th century, this monument spans the river Elorn, replacing a wooden structure that dated back to the 12th century. The buildings, which stand on granite piles, have been home to generations of wealthy artisans and linen merchants. To get a good view of the slate-covered corbels, it’s best to stand a little way off, a few strides up the right-hand bank.
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Landerneau
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In the bay of Brest, between the Léon and Cornouaille areas, and between the river and the sea, Landerneau has a remarkable architectural heritage. The jewel in its architectural crown is the famous Rohan bridge, the only bridge in Europe that still has people living on it. As you explore around it, you’ll pass a succession of beautiful residences dating from the 16th to 19th centuries. The superb Rohan bridge stands at the furthest point reached by the tide, with its six stone arches standing in salt water. Built in the 16th century, this monument spans the river Elorn, replacing a wooden structure that dated back to the 12th century. The buildings, which stand on granite piles, have been home to generations of wealthy artisans and linen merchants. To get a good view of the slate-covered corbels, it’s best to stand a little way off, a few strides up the right-hand bank.
The extraordinary coastal hamlet of Meneham, lies low amidst the great boulders that dramatically litter the Kerlouan coastline. The most startling building, a 17th-century coastguard’s cottage with stone roof, sits cunningly disguised between two huge rocks. It went up to spy on the sea in the period when France and England were at war. The village behind is of later date, built in part to house customs men trying to stop smuggling. Then farmers moved in, but in the last century, the place became increasingly neglected. Recently, Meneham has been brought back to life as a showcase village. The lovely buildings set among the sandy grasslands have all been restored, many with thatch. Films projected in various parts tell of the communities who lived here in the past. Fine craft shops have opened in the semi-detached dwellings at the centre of the community.
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Kerlouan
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The extraordinary coastal hamlet of Meneham, lies low amidst the great boulders that dramatically litter the Kerlouan coastline. The most startling building, a 17th-century coastguard’s cottage with stone roof, sits cunningly disguised between two huge rocks. It went up to spy on the sea in the period when France and England were at war. The village behind is of later date, built in part to house customs men trying to stop smuggling. Then farmers moved in, but in the last century, the place became increasingly neglected. Recently, Meneham has been brought back to life as a showcase village. The lovely buildings set among the sandy grasslands have all been restored, many with thatch. Films projected in various parts tell of the communities who lived here in the past. Fine craft shops have opened in the semi-detached dwellings at the centre of the community.
Built on a peninsula surrounded by the Channel, Roscoff is well worth a detour. This small town of character has attractive, richly decorated houses that once belonged to ship-owners, a church in the flamboyant Gothic style, and much more. Visitors never fail to be charmed by this town, which is both a port and a seaside resort. Offshore is the Isle of Batz, with a mild climate that makes it an ideal place to relax. In the 19th century, Roscoff traded in cloth, salt and wood… even onions exported to England. Everything in its historic centre evokes the wealth of maritime trade: from the church hidden away in its garden to the opulent granite dwellings; from the boats sculpted out of stone to the turrets in the old harbour. The spirit of corsairs, smugglers and merchants still seems to hover around the entrances to elaborate cellars that open at street or beach level.
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Roscoff
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Built on a peninsula surrounded by the Channel, Roscoff is well worth a detour. This small town of character has attractive, richly decorated houses that once belonged to ship-owners, a church in the flamboyant Gothic style, and much more. Visitors never fail to be charmed by this town, which is both a port and a seaside resort. Offshore is the Isle of Batz, with a mild climate that makes it an ideal place to relax. In the 19th century, Roscoff traded in cloth, salt and wood… even onions exported to England. Everything in its historic centre evokes the wealth of maritime trade: from the church hidden away in its garden to the opulent granite dwellings; from the boats sculpted out of stone to the turrets in the old harbour. The spirit of corsairs, smugglers and merchants still seems to hover around the entrances to elaborate cellars that open at street or beach level.
It takes just 15 minutes to get there, but you feel as if you’re in another country. The delightful Isle of Batz is best explored along its magnificent coastal paths. The island depends on fishing, tourism and the cultivation of spring fruit and vegetables. You’ll love its mild climate and amazing garden full of tropical species. A few remains from a former Bronze Age burial ground show that people lived here at least 5,000 years ago, when this low-lying island (Batz means ‘low’) was probably still attached to the mainland. In the 6th century, a monastic community was founded here by a Welsh monk, Paul Aurélien, who was to become the first bishop of Léon. On the site of the monastery you can admire the ruins of the later church of Sainte-Anne. This little piece of land was on a migration route and was frequently pillaged.
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Île de Batz
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It takes just 15 minutes to get there, but you feel as if you’re in another country. The delightful Isle of Batz is best explored along its magnificent coastal paths. The island depends on fishing, tourism and the cultivation of spring fruit and vegetables. You’ll love its mild climate and amazing garden full of tropical species. A few remains from a former Bronze Age burial ground show that people lived here at least 5,000 years ago, when this low-lying island (Batz means ‘low’) was probably still attached to the mainland. In the 6th century, a monastic community was founded here by a Welsh monk, Paul Aurélien, who was to become the first bishop of Léon. On the site of the monastery you can admire the ruins of the later church of Sainte-Anne. This little piece of land was on a migration route and was frequently pillaged.
There’s a sublime quality to the scenery along the Côte des Abers, also called the Côte des Légendes. Here, sea meets untamed coastline and the tides make inroads into the green landscape. Majestic lighthouses keep watch at the entrance to these havens of peace, which you can reach on foot or by yacht. The indentations of the abers create an intricate pattern in the Breton countryside, and each one has its treasures. Aber Wrac’h is a place of contrasts, where the Baie des Anges (Bay of Angels) lies next to the Pont du Diable (Devil’s Bridge). The mouth of the bay, guarded by many little islands, is a peaceful area for ramblers or windsurfers. Aber Benoît, snaking along between fields and tree-lined riverbanks, is famous for its delicious oysters. They’re a great way to finish a walk in the salty sea air! Aber Ildut, between the Atlantic Ocean and the English Channel, provides a natural shelter for boats and is always accessible. It can be reached by a cliff-top walk along a coastline that’s a mixture of rocks, sand dunes and creeks.
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Plouguerneau
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There’s a sublime quality to the scenery along the Côte des Abers, also called the Côte des Légendes. Here, sea meets untamed coastline and the tides make inroads into the green landscape. Majestic lighthouses keep watch at the entrance to these havens of peace, which you can reach on foot or by yacht. The indentations of the abers create an intricate pattern in the Breton countryside, and each one has its treasures. Aber Wrac’h is a place of contrasts, where the Baie des Anges (Bay of Angels) lies next to the Pont du Diable (Devil’s Bridge). The mouth of the bay, guarded by many little islands, is a peaceful area for ramblers or windsurfers. Aber Benoît, snaking along between fields and tree-lined riverbanks, is famous for its delicious oysters. They’re a great way to finish a walk in the salty sea air! Aber Ildut, between the Atlantic Ocean and the English Channel, provides a natural shelter for boats and is always accessible. It can be reached by a cliff-top walk along a coastline that’s a mixture of rocks, sand dunes and creeks.
Several communities of artisans and traders have left the mark of their life of labour in the memory of this little town of character. The interpretive trail “En suivant Yann, le Roi des Chiffonniers” (Follow Yann, the king of the rag-pickers) unveils the secrets of the past. On the banks of the Jaudy, the memory of the sailing ships that brought wealth to the city is revived. In summer, the rectory garden, with its planted squares and flax workshops, brings the region’s past linked to flax back to life.
La Roche-Derrien
Several communities of artisans and traders have left the mark of their life of labour in the memory of this little town of character. The interpretive trail “En suivant Yann, le Roi des Chiffonniers” (Follow Yann, the king of the rag-pickers) unveils the secrets of the past. On the banks of the Jaudy, the memory of the sailing ships that brought wealth to the city is revived. In summer, the rectory garden, with its planted squares and flax workshops, brings the region’s past linked to flax back to life.
The historic town of Lannion, the capital of Trégor and the gateway to the Pink Granite Coast, is an elegant combination of tradition and modernity. It has a subtle architectural line-up consisting of mansion houses, manors, a former convent and cloister, while the technology park breathes an air of innovation and energy over the city.
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Lannion
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The historic town of Lannion, the capital of Trégor and the gateway to the Pink Granite Coast, is an elegant combination of tradition and modernity. It has a subtle architectural line-up consisting of mansion houses, manors, a former convent and cloister, while the technology park breathes an air of innovation and energy over the city.
With its 13 km of coastline and three fine sandy beaches, Perros is heaven for families and watersports fans. Around the corner is Ploumanac’h, a former fishing village that has become a magnet for holidaymakers. It offers visitors an almost unbelievable view, with its pink rocks: imposing masses of stone sculpted by the sea and wind. An exceptionally beautiful natural site.
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Perros-Guirec
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With its 13 km of coastline and three fine sandy beaches, Perros is heaven for families and watersports fans. Around the corner is Ploumanac’h, a former fishing village that has become a magnet for holidaymakers. It offers visitors an almost unbelievable view, with its pink rocks: imposing masses of stone sculpted by the sea and wind. An exceptionally beautiful natural site.
LIKE A WHITE SEAGULL FACING THE OPEN WATERS AND SCANNING THE HORIZON, THE LITTLE LIGHTHOUSE IN PONTUSVAL WAS LIT UP FOR THE FIRST TIME ON 15 SEPTEMBER 1869. Built at the time to alert ships to the dangerous reefs running along the Côte des Légendes, it is still in operation today, midway between the Ile Vierge and Ile de Batz Lighthouses. It has been a listed historic monument since 2011, and the building’s owner, Phares et Balises, must still continue to maintain it. This is a magical place, whose wonderment is only further accentuated by the fine sandy beaches lined with rocks sculpted by the wind, the sea and time. Located in the new municipality of Plounéour-Brignogan-Plages, it is now one of the must-see gems of the Côte des Légendes.
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Brignogan-Plages
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LIKE A WHITE SEAGULL FACING THE OPEN WATERS AND SCANNING THE HORIZON, THE LITTLE LIGHTHOUSE IN PONTUSVAL WAS LIT UP FOR THE FIRST TIME ON 15 SEPTEMBER 1869. Built at the time to alert ships to the dangerous reefs running along the Côte des Légendes, it is still in operation today, midway between the Ile Vierge and Ile de Batz Lighthouses. It has been a listed historic monument since 2011, and the building’s owner, Phares et Balises, must still continue to maintain it. This is a magical place, whose wonderment is only further accentuated by the fine sandy beaches lined with rocks sculpted by the wind, the sea and time. Located in the new municipality of Plounéour-Brignogan-Plages, it is now one of the must-see gems of the Côte des Légendes.
Lesneven was a military capital in the Middle Ages and then later, the administrative and judicial capital of the Diocese of Léon, and is now a town of academics and commerce. Known as the “town of three flowers”, acknowledging its pleasant quality of life and environment, Lesneven is great to explore along its granite coloured streets lined with ancient houses. A focal point at the centre of the Côte des Légendes, it offers a multitude of local services and a wide selection of businesses. Many boutiques liven up the town all year long. Every Monday, a crowd from across the region gravitates to and takes over Place Le Flo and the adjoining squares. The town becomes a preferred place for strolling, meeting up, reconnecting and, above, for “good deals”! So, why not settle in at a sidewalk café to prolong your enjoyment of this friendly atmosphere? In the summertime, there are more than 120 shops, and the delicious smells of rotisseries and other prepared meals will compel you to give in! To the delight of young and old alike, the small animals market sets up on Place du Pont. How can anyone not be moved at the sight of these living cuddly toys, so easily within arm’s reach for a pet! This great eclectic and colourful jumble has been a fixture since the Middle Ages and remains one of the biggest events in Finistère.
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Lesneven
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Lesneven was a military capital in the Middle Ages and then later, the administrative and judicial capital of the Diocese of Léon, and is now a town of academics and commerce. Known as the “town of three flowers”, acknowledging its pleasant quality of life and environment, Lesneven is great to explore along its granite coloured streets lined with ancient houses. A focal point at the centre of the Côte des Légendes, it offers a multitude of local services and a wide selection of businesses. Many boutiques liven up the town all year long. Every Monday, a crowd from across the region gravitates to and takes over Place Le Flo and the adjoining squares. The town becomes a preferred place for strolling, meeting up, reconnecting and, above, for “good deals”! So, why not settle in at a sidewalk café to prolong your enjoyment of this friendly atmosphere? In the summertime, there are more than 120 shops, and the delicious smells of rotisseries and other prepared meals will compel you to give in! To the delight of young and old alike, the small animals market sets up on Place du Pont. How can anyone not be moved at the sight of these living cuddly toys, so easily within arm’s reach for a pet! This great eclectic and colourful jumble has been a fixture since the Middle Ages and remains one of the biggest events in Finistère.
The basilica is not only famous for the religious fervour and the legend that surround it. The building itself is also a lovely architectural complex. The Gothic church built in the flamboyant style was the idea of Jean IV, Duke of Brittany, and was completed under the reign of his son Jean V in 1453. Anne of Brittany visited it on multiple occasions, which further enhanced its popularity. Although it was the victim of fires and damage during the French Revolution, it still managed to preserve its incredible rood screen made of delicately chiselled stones from Kersanton. Outside, don’t forget to take a look at the amazing fountain, whose source is under the basilica’s high altar. « Salaün Ar Foll » This character, and the words he is said to have repeated continuously throughout his life, “Ave Maria”, still resonate here. After the miracles said to have taken place following his death, the place became a major pilgrimage destination. His story inspired artists to create an installation in the orchard for Les Ribin’ de l’Imaginaire 2020 (see p. 15). Even now, more than 20,000 pilgrims come here each year, the first weekend in September, for the Pardon, a shared time where piety and belief are mixed with a touch of folklore, as people bring out their banners and costumes.
Le Folgoët
The basilica is not only famous for the religious fervour and the legend that surround it. The building itself is also a lovely architectural complex. The Gothic church built in the flamboyant style was the idea of Jean IV, Duke of Brittany, and was completed under the reign of his son Jean V in 1453. Anne of Brittany visited it on multiple occasions, which further enhanced its popularity. Although it was the victim of fires and damage during the French Revolution, it still managed to preserve its incredible rood screen made of delicately chiselled stones from Kersanton. Outside, don’t forget to take a look at the amazing fountain, whose source is under the basilica’s high altar. « Salaün Ar Foll » This character, and the words he is said to have repeated continuously throughout his life, “Ave Maria”, still resonate here. After the miracles said to have taken place following his death, the place became a major pilgrimage destination. His story inspired artists to create an installation in the orchard for Les Ribin’ de l’Imaginaire 2020 (see p. 15). Even now, more than 20,000 pilgrims come here each year, the first weekend in September, for the Pardon, a shared time where piety and belief are mixed with a touch of folklore, as people bring out their banners and costumes.
Near the steep cliffs battered by the sea and winds, a striking lighthouse watches over the ruins of a former abbey. It’s a compelling scene. Pointe Saint-Mathieu feels like the very essence of Brittany. A short walk away is the port of Le Conquet, the departure point for trips to the Isles of Ouessant and Molène. Nearby, the little village of Plougonvelin gives an authentic Breton feel to this family-friendly resort.
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Le Conquet
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Near the steep cliffs battered by the sea and winds, a striking lighthouse watches over the ruins of a former abbey. It’s a compelling scene. Pointe Saint-Mathieu feels like the very essence of Brittany. A short walk away is the port of Le Conquet, the departure point for trips to the Isles of Ouessant and Molène. Nearby, the little village of Plougonvelin gives an authentic Breton feel to this family-friendly resort.
Do you want to visit a Breton island? why not go on a day trip to Ushant. Located 25 km from the coast, the island of Ouessant is the westernmost land in mainland France. You will discover a small Ireland with sparse habitat. Most of the life is concentrated around the church in the village of Lampaul. The Ouessantine recipe: crochet curtains, blue shutters, Ouessant weathervanes, dry stone walls, black sheep, mills, lighthouses… Wondering how to visit Ushant for the day? There are plenty of solutions! You can go hiking, cycle the island of Ouessant or let yourself be guided by the islanders in the discovery of their island.
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Ushant
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Do you want to visit a Breton island? why not go on a day trip to Ushant. Located 25 km from the coast, the island of Ouessant is the westernmost land in mainland France. You will discover a small Ireland with sparse habitat. Most of the life is concentrated around the church in the village of Lampaul. The Ouessantine recipe: crochet curtains, blue shutters, Ouessant weathervanes, dry stone walls, black sheep, mills, lighthouses… Wondering how to visit Ushant for the day? There are plenty of solutions! You can go hiking, cycle the island of Ouessant or let yourself be guided by the islanders in the discovery of their island.
Quimper has been awarded the " Ville d'Art et d'Histoire" (City of Art and History ) label thanks to the quality of its architectural heritage: the St Corentin cathedral, the 16th and 17th century houses that stand alongside the ramparts and the Odet quays, the Locmaria district, the museums, the lively and commercial streets, walk through the medieval city and the 19th century footbridges, find echoes of the market...
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Quimper
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Quimper has been awarded the " Ville d'Art et d'Histoire" (City of Art and History ) label thanks to the quality of its architectural heritage: the St Corentin cathedral, the 16th and 17th century houses that stand alongside the ramparts and the Odet quays, the Locmaria district, the museums, the lively and commercial streets, walk through the medieval city and the 19th century footbridges, find echoes of the market...
The Crozon peninsula, shaped like a gigantic cross in the Iroise sea, sums up the essence of Brittany. The landscape shifts from spectacular cliff scenery to heather-covered moorland, then to deep blue sea and beautiful beaches. The pretty little ports of Camaret and Morgat are the starting point for voyages of discovery. Camaret, situated on the western tip of the peninsula, is a traditional port where you can enjoy a walk along the bustling quays lined with brightly-painted houses. On the jetty you’ll find the chapel of Notre-Dame de Rocamadour, famous for the model boats that are left there as offerings. Continue your walk to the Vauban tower, known as the ‘Tour dorée’, or Golden Tower, because of its ochre colour. Listed as a Unesco World Heritage Site, it used to protect the spit of stones known as the Sillon de Camaret, and the entrance to the Goulet de Brest (the stretch of sea linking the Bay of Brest to the ocean). At night, the ‘cimetière marin’, or boats’ graveyard, with its silhouettes of boats lying along the shingle beach, is a romantic sight.
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Crozon
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The Crozon peninsula, shaped like a gigantic cross in the Iroise sea, sums up the essence of Brittany. The landscape shifts from spectacular cliff scenery to heather-covered moorland, then to deep blue sea and beautiful beaches. The pretty little ports of Camaret and Morgat are the starting point for voyages of discovery. Camaret, situated on the western tip of the peninsula, is a traditional port where you can enjoy a walk along the bustling quays lined with brightly-painted houses. On the jetty you’ll find the chapel of Notre-Dame de Rocamadour, famous for the model boats that are left there as offerings. Continue your walk to the Vauban tower, known as the ‘Tour dorée’, or Golden Tower, because of its ochre colour. Listed as a Unesco World Heritage Site, it used to protect the spit of stones known as the Sillon de Camaret, and the entrance to the Goulet de Brest (the stretch of sea linking the Bay of Brest to the ocean). At night, the ‘cimetière marin’, or boats’ graveyard, with its silhouettes of boats lying along the shingle beach, is a romantic sight.